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How FPGAs work, and why you'll buy one


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With all these advantages, why just 1% of the global semiconductor sales? One reasonable answer is that it took FPGAs a long time to evolve into their current state. Things FPGAs have today that they didn't have in the past include:

  • Fixed-function hardware essential for performance - this gradually progressed from RAM to DSP slices to complete CPUs.
  • Quick runtime reconfiguration, so that you can run convolution and then replace it with FFT - which you can't, and shouldn't be able to do, if you're thinking of FPGA as simulating one circuit.
  • Practically useable C-to-Verilog compilers, letting programmers, at least reasonably hardcore ones, who nonetheless aren't circuit designers, to approach FPGA programming easily enough.

All of these things cater to programmers as much or more than they cater to circuit designers. This shows that FPGAs are gunning for a position in the large-scale software delivery market, outside their traditional small-scale circuit implementation niche. (Marketing material by FPGA vendors confirms their intentions more directly.)

So from this angle, FPGAs evolved from a circuit implementation platform into a software delivery platform. Being a strong programmable architecture, they're expected to rise greatly in popularity, and, like other programmable architectures, end up everywhere.

I've heard similar arguments used for why I will buy a Raspberry Pi someday.

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