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Inspired by Nefertiti


Nefertiti (ca. 1370 BC – ca. 1330 BC) was the Great Royal Wife (chief consort) of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nefertiti and her husband were known for a religious revolution, in which they worshiped one god only, Aten, or the sun disc.

Nefertiti had many titles including Hereditary Princess (iryt-p`t); Great of Praises (wrt-hzwt); Lady of Grace (nbt-im3t), Sweet of Love (bnrt-mrwt); Lady of The Two Lands (nbt-t3wy); Main King’s Wife, his beloved (hmt-niswt-‘3t meryt.f); Great King’s Wife, his beloved (hmt-niswt-wrt meryt.f), Lady of all Women (hnwt-hmwt-nbwt); and Mistress of Upper and Lower Egypt (hnwt-Shm’w-mhw).[1]

She was made famous by her bust, now in Berlin's Neues Museum, shown to the right. The bust is one of the most copied works ofancient Egypt. It was attributed to the sculptor Thutmose, and it was found in his workshop. The bust is notable for exemplifying the understanding Ancient Egyptians had regarding realistic facial proportions. Some scholars believe that Nefertiti ruled briefly asNeferneferuaten after her husband's death and before the accession of Tutankhamun, although this identification is a matter of ongoing debate.[2]

This is one of the rare cult statues associated with the Ancient Egyptian queen, Nefertiti. The sculpture is made in France from hand-finished resin and measures 37cm high.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nefertiti

Inspired by an Ancient Egyptian original made of red quartzile, this statue of Nefertiti shows the artistic style of Akhenaton, an ancient Egyptian king (XVIIIth Dynasty). Under Akhenaton's rule, Egyptian art adopted a revolutionary new style - moving away from the traditional Egyptian style of portraying people with ideal, perfect physiques, to a new and rather jarring style as illustrated here. It would seem that the artists were attempting to portray people with brutal honesty, to the extent that the images became caricatures. 

The excessive size of Nefertiti's hips and thighs, among other things, was thought to evoke the source of life, a gift from the god that lives in them and that they in turn pass on to their subjects. This explains why beautiful and mysterious Nefertiti (it is probably her), with her adolescent bust, is distorted.

The bottom-heavy weight is however lessened by the elegant and intelligent arrangement of the pleats, evoking solar rays, of the tunic and shawl. The pleats soften the body; the material, a beautiful red quartzite, also gives it an incredibly lively intensity.

Far from the usual cliches representing Nefertiti's face alone, this suggestive though mutilated work probably shows her advancing toward Aton (the sun god), with her eyes closed and her right hand raised in sign of respect.

Torso of Queen Nefertiti - British Museum shop online

Torso of Queen Nefertiti - British Museum shop online

Torso of Queen Nefertiti - British Museum shop online

Nefertiti

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Nefertiti

Nefertiti

Nefertiti

Nefertiti

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