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I constantly monitor my blood sugar level - I've collected more than 565K rows of data about my blood sugar, I am big data


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-lucas/health-care-costs_b_3867549.html

america healthcare

Already, big data abounds in the health care industry. In its 2011 report titled "Big Data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity," the McKinsey Global Institute estimated that more than $300 billion a year in new value can be created in health care by 2021, with two-thirds of that coming from reductions to national health care expenses.

Every day, I constantly monitor my blood sugar level -- this information is crucial for me to manage my symptoms in the short term. In the past year alone, I've received more than 5,000 alerts warning me that my levels are too high or too low. I've collected more than 565,000 rows of data about my blood sugar -- I am big data, and you are too.

Living with diabetes and working with big data, I see a revolution in how we can treat diseases using tiny health measurements at a global scale. I want the blood sugar data I record to get sent automatically to my physician, who could get alerted of any disturbances in my blood sugar that would change my treatment plan. I want that data to go to a government health agency and health care organization to contribute to researching this national health care challenge. Imagine the incredible impact my readings, anonymously collected and added to the 30 million other readings out there, could have on health care professionals to identify trends, analyze effective treatments, predict outcomes and improve long-term patient care.

The scenario from my personal life is just one example of how clinical data can be leveraged. In payment and pricing, we'll see dramatic improvement in fraud detection as well as the application of adaptive pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement. In clinical operations, we will conduct comparative research more productively, while achieving more accurate clinical decisions and advanced patient profiles. In medical research and development, we can use predictive modeling to better design clinical trials and offer personalized medicine.

Making this a reality will require the public sector to embrace technology at a level equal to the private sector. Already, federal and state IT officials recognize the benefit of big data technology.

From the cradle to the grave, we never stop generating data. Every heartbeat, every commute, every purchase, and every interaction adds to the growing cacophony of information. As a diabetic, I'm encouraged that we have powerful enough tools in my lifetime to reach into that noise, isolate the notes that ring true, and share the resulting symphony with the whole world

Stashed in: #health, Big Data!, Quantified Self, Medicine, science, Diabetes, Big Data, Healthcare

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5000 alerts in a year seems high. Is 5000 alerts high?

Every day, I constantly monitor my blood sugar level -- this information is crucial for me to manage my symptoms in the short term. In the past year alone, I've received more than 5,000 alerts warning me that my levels are too high or too low. I've collected more than 565,000 rows of data about my blood sugar -- I am big data, and you are too.

I guess he has a Continuous Glucose Monitoring Device (http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/treatment-and-products/continuous-glucose-monitoring

continuous glucose monitoring

By the way, have you seen Scanadu?

http://www.scanadu.com/

I had not seen Scanadu. Neat!

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