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Are businesses so enamored with the process of data science that they fail to turn the insights into valuable actions


http://insights.wired.com/profiles/blogs/the-importance-of-making-your-big-data-system-insightful#axzz2k0KbyEDQ

With all the emphasis these days that’s placed on combing through the piles of potentially invaluable data that resides within an enterprise, it’s possible for a business to lose sight of the need to turn the discoveries generated by data analysis into valuable actions.

Sure, insights and observations that arise from data analysis are interesting and compelling, but they really aren’t worth much unless they can be converted into some kind of business value, whether it’s, say, fine tuning the experience of customers who are considering abandoning your product or service, or modeling an abuse detection system to block traffic from malicious users.

Digging jewels like these out of piles of enterprise data might be viewed by some as a mysterious art, but it’s not. It’s a process of many steps, considerations, and potential pitfalls, but it’s important for business stakeholders to have a grip on how the process works and the strategy considerations that go into data analysis. You’ve got to know the right questions to ask. Otherwise, there’s a risk that data science stays isolated, instead of evolving into business science.

mining rubies

The Insights Pipeline

You can visualize an insights pipeline as a kind of flow chart that encompasses the journey from a broad business goal, question or hypothesis to a business insight.

Data scientists engage in this kind of exploration to uncover business-critical insights, but they might not know what shapes these insights will take when they begin their research. These insights are then presented to business stakeholders, who interpret the results and put them to use in making strategic or tactical decisions.

The Analytical Last Mile

Making decisions is one of the most challenging parts of doing business. In IT, employees are very comfortable delivering reports or assembling dashboards. But deciding on an action plan based upon that information isn’t easy, and lots of insights but few decisions introduces a lag time that in turn erodes business value.

The analytical last mile represents the time and effort required to use analytics insights to actually improve the state of a businesses. You might have invested heavily in big data technologies and produced all kinds of dashboards and reports, but this adds up to very little if interesting observations aren’t converted into action.

The value of analytics and a data-driven culture is only realized when the analytical last mile is covered quickly and efficiently. The inability to do this often results in lost business efficiency and unrealized business value.

A “Data First” Strategy

When you define, design, and introduce a new product or service, data generation, collection and analysis, and product optimization might be the last thing you’re thinking of. It should be the first.

A “data first” strategy ensures that the right kind of technology is in place to deliver insights that can improve the end user experience. Thinking through what kinds of user data might be collected ensures that the enterprise isn’t caught off guard when the new product or service begins to gain momentum.

Partnerships

A lot of skills and capabilities are required to take a data-driven effort to optimize the user experience and turn that into an actual, tangible improvement in your customer’s experience and, ultimately, boost the enterprise’s bottom line.

Many of these skills are not traditionally part of a business’ core competencies, so partnerships are a great way to bring in outside expertise to help polish the customer experience. Some areas where enterprises look to partners for help include: the ability to reach customers with content, offers, deals, and ads across multiple channels, devices or platforms; the ability to access user transaction history across multiple services and products; and the capability to know users’ locations at any point in time.

But it’s critical that business stakeholders have an awareness of the process, think about the right strategic considerations, and realize the importance of moving quickly and decisively once insights are delivered. Otherwise, it’s all too easy for a business to get mired in data science, instead of transforming a valuable insight into an even more valuable action.

Read more: http://insights.wired.com/profiles/blogs/the-importance-of-making-your-big-data-system-insightful#ixzz2kbJmlcNd 

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