Sign up FAST! Login

Pete Carroll and his defensive philosophy


Stashed in: 49ers!, Football, #greatness, FAIL, #winning, Best PandaWhale Posts, #success, Jim Harbaugh, Strategery, Teamwork, Awesome, Philosophy, Stories, Late Bloomers, Seattle, Seahawks

To save this post, select a stash from drop-down menu or type in a new one:

You want to understand the Seahawks, you NEED to read this article about Pete Carroll's return from failure with his 4-3 Under defense.

I do love this story of Richard Sherman in that article:

After a bunch of these emails, Sherman speaks up (sic‘d throughout): “To all You assholes complaining … If you dint like it live in another dorm next year then because tradition is tradition and If your Homosexual don’t celebrate the holidayy if its that big of a deal but im tired of yall complaining about a couple of hours of sleep yall are some assholes. Stop bitching and f**kin adapt I wake up that early everyday and I aint complaining so you guys really need to just shut the f**k up. Everyone else had fun so f**k the people who are complaining.”

It’s glorious. Not even for the message, but for its general middle-finger tone. “Stop bitching and adapt” could be this defense’s message to the whole world. To Jim Harbaugh whining about PEDs, to offensive coordinators complaining about interference, or to anyone who thinksthey don’t respect the game.

“Stop bitching and adapt” is a great mantra for greatness.

In the article atop this page, Grantland's Chris Brown talks about how it took Pete Carroll 20 years to build to this successful machine. Pete Carroll himself attributes their success to having a philosophy:

Much of the credit goes to Carroll’s defense, which has been the foundation of his success and remains closely tied to the first lessons he learned as a very young coach. “To be successful on defense, you need to develop a philosophy,”Carroll said at a coaching clinic while still at USC. “If you don’t have a clear view of your philosophy, you will be floundering all over the place. If you win, it will be pure luck.”

And then later:

The Carroll who coached the Jets and Patriots wouldn’t have been able to build and maintain the kind of team he now has in Seattle. He had the schemes, but he hadn’t yet mastered their application. Carroll has evolved over time by turning earlier failures into lessons.

Interestingly, Carroll’s own description of this evolution is somewhat paradoxical: “There is no offensive play calling or defensive scheme that is going to win championships for you. It is how you can adapt and adjust to making the schemes work. The only way you can do that is to have a strong belief system [emphasis mine].”

That explanation might only make sense to Carroll, a man who counts both John Wooden and Jerry Garcia among his primary influences. Carroll thinks his unshakable belief in those early lessons from Holtz and Kiffin have enabled him to evolve those ideas and adapt them to the present, and, most importantly, to improve as a coach. In the spirit of that seeming paradox, here’s one of my own: Pete Carroll, the coach who succeeded through failing.

Great article ... and another story about how learning from failure can often produce the best results.

Mark, you got that right.

I love this part Grantland's Chris Brown:

The Carroll who coached the Jets and Patriots wouldn’t have been able to build and maintain the kind of team he now has in Seattle. He had the schemes, but he hadn’t yet mastered their application. Carroll has evolved over time by turning earlier failures into lessons.

Interestingly, Carroll’s own description of this evolution is somewhat paradoxical: “There is no offensive play calling or defensive scheme that is going to win championships for you. It is how you can adapt and adjust to making the schemes work. The only way you can do that is to have a strong belief system [emphasis mine].”

That explanation might only make sense to Carroll, a man who counts both John Wooden and Jerry Garcia among his primary influences. Carroll thinks his unshakable belief in those early lessons from Holtz and Kiffin have enabled him to evolve those ideas and adapt them to the present, and, most importantly, to improve as a coach. In the spirit of that seeming paradox, here’s one of my own: Pete Carroll, the coach who succeeded through failing.

Mark, agreed, and as Joyce pointed out, the article about not complaining is also worth a read:

http://grantland.com/the-triangle/stop-bitching-and-adapt-a-celebration-of-the-seahawks-defense/

Bill Barnwell analyzes the Seahawks Niners championship game:

http://grantland.com/features/nfc-championship-preview-the-game-we-all-wanted/

You May Also Like: