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The U.S. Cities With the Worst Climate Change-Related Flooding


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The number of "nuisance flooding" days in the U.S. has shot up markedly since the middle of last century, by as much as 925 percent in Annapolis and 922 percent in Baltimore. And as the oceans continue to swell—a byproduct of melting glaciers and the heat expansion of water—we can expect these waterlogged days to become yet more common, especially on the East Coast,says the report's lead author, William Sweet.

"Flooding now occurs with high tides in many locations due to climate-related sea level rise, land subsidence and the loss of natural barriers," Sweet says. "The effects of rising sea levels along most of the continental U.S. coastline are only going to become more noticeable and much more severe in the coming decades, probably more so than any other climate-change related factor."

Some states get floods and some states get droughts. Unreal. 

I was surprised to see San Francisco in the danger zone!

By looking at data from the 1960s onward, Sweet's team found that nuisance flooding is on the rise on all three U.S. coasts but is hitting certain places much harder. The Atlantic shore around the vicinity of Chesapeake Bay is enjoying frequent trips to the dunk tank because the land there is also sinking (partly due to groundwater pumping). That's why Norfolk is on NOAA's list of the nation's top-10 nuisance-flood areas; for various other reasons, so is Atlantic City, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. Down South there's been a 547 percent rise in flood days in Port Isabel, Texas. And waves lapping at smart-car tires is increasingly becoming the soundtrack for San Francisco, with a 364 percent bump in flood days.

San Francisco is one of those unique places in danger of both drastic drought AND epic flooding.

Depending on how it all plays out, we could also fall victim to massive earthquake.

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