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Islamic State group ISIS becomes target of Arab satire

Stashed in: Middle East, war

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In one skit produced by the "Ktir Salbe Show," a taxi driver picks up a jihadi who rejects listening to radio because it didn't exist in the earliest days of Islam, a knock on the Islamic State group's literal take on the Quran. The driver offers to turn on the air conditioning, but that too is rejected. The jihadi finally criticizes him for answering a mobile phone.

Fed up, the driver asks: "Were there taxi cabs in the earliest days?"

"No, 1,000 times no!" the passenger answers. The driver responds by kicking out the jihadi and telling him to wait for a camel instead.

Even the dark videos of mass shootings conducted by the Islamic State group have become comedic fodder. Palestinian television channel al-Falastiniya aired a skit showing two militants shooting Muslim civilians for their lack of knowledge on the number of times to kneel during prayers, all the while reminiscing over the beautiful women and best party neighborhoods they'd visited in Beirut.

When a Jordanian Christian approaches, the two militants begin fighting each other over who gets to shoot him — each wanting the "blessing" for himself. Terrified, the man suffers a fatal heart attack, leaving the militants devastated.

They're using satire to try to teach people to be less afraid:

"These people are not a true representation of Islam and so by mocking them, it is a way to show that we are against them," said Nabil Assaf, one of the producers and writers of Lebanon's "Ktir Salbe Show," which has challenged the group. "Of course it's a sensitive issue, but this is one way to reject extremism and make it so the people are not afraid."

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