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Artificial Intelligence Pioneer Stuart Russell Has a Few Concerns


Stashed in: Turing, Singularity!, @elonmusk, AI, Ray Kurzweil!

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Here is some serious food for thought as we keep developing AI. Data's "prime directive" seems more and more like a really good idea...

I'm not sure what that means, but this is chilling:

“Could you prove that your systems can’t ever, no matter how smart they are, overwrite their original goals as set by the humans?” Another thing that’s really essential is to think about the decision problem at multiple levels of abstraction, so “hierarchical decision making.” A person does roughly 20 trillion physical actions in their lifetime. Coming to this conference to give a talk works out to 1.3 billion or something. If you were rational you’d be trying to look ahead 1.3 billion steps—completely, absurdly impossible. So the way humans manage this is by having this very rich store of abstract, high-level actions. You don’t think, “First I can either move my left foot or my right foot, and then after that I can either…” You think, “I’ll go on Expedia and book a flight. When I land, I’ll take a taxi.” And that’s it. I don’t think about it anymore until I actually get off the plane at the airport and look for the sign that says “taxi”—then I get down into more detail. This is how we live our lives, basically. The future is spread out, with a lot of detail very close to us in time, but these big chunks where we’ve made commitments to very abstract actions, like, “get a Ph.D.,” “have children.”

Once again Elon Musk shows up as a leader:

IN JANUARY, THE British-American computer scientist  Stuart Russell drafted and became the first signatory of an open letter calling for researchers to look beyond the goal of merely making artificial intelligence more powerful. “We recommend expanded research aimed at ensuring that increasingly capable AI systems are robust and beneficial,” the letter states. “Our AI systems must do what we want them to do.” Thousands of people have since signed the letter, including leading artificial intelligence researchers at Google, Facebook, Microsoft and other industry hubs along with top computer scientists, physicists and philosophers around the world. By the end of March, about 300 research groups had applied to pursue new research into “keeping artificial intelligence beneficial” with funds contributed by the letter’s 37th signatory, the inventor-entrepreneur Elon Musk.

Russell, 53, a professor of computer science and founder of the Center for Intelligent Systems at the University of California, Berkeley, has long been contemplating the power and perils of thinking machines. He is the author of more than 200 papers as well as the field’s standard textbook, Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (with Peter Norvig, head of research at Google). But increasingly rapid advances in artificial intelligence have given Russell’s longstanding concerns heightened urgency.

Recently, he says, artificial intelligence has made major strides, partly on the strength of neuro-inspired learning algorithms. These are used in Facebook’s face-recognition software, smartphone personal assistants and Google’s self-driving cars. In a bombshell result reported recently in Nature, a simulated network of artificial neurons learned to play Atari video games better than humans in a matter of hours given only data representing the screen and the goal of increasing the score at the top—but no preprogrammed knowledge of aliens, bullets, left, right, up or down. “If your newborn baby did that you would think it was possessed,” Russell said.

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