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How Solar Lanterns Are Giving Power to the People


How Solar Lanterns Are Giving Power to the People National Geographic magazine

Mandal, whose home sits illegally on public land at the edge of a tiger reserve, is just a tiny cog in a surging new economic machine, one that involves hundreds of companies working aggressively to sell small solar-powered units to off-grid customers in developing nations to help fill their growing energy needs. Roughly 1.1 billion people in the world live without access to electricity, and close to a quarter of them are in India, where people like Mandal have been forced to rely on noxious kerosene and bulky, acid-leaking batteries.

Mandal’s solar unit, which powers two LED lights and a fan, is energized by a 40-watt solar panel. Sun beats down on the panel, charging a small, orange power station for roughly ten hours at a time. Mandal leases the kit from SimpaNetworks. A for-profit company with a name derived from the notion of “simple payments,” Simpa offers subscription plans structured to fit the budgets of low-income consumers. Even so, the equivalent of roughly 35 cents a day is a massive expenditure for Mandal, who supports his family on a razor-thin budget of less than two dollars a day. Food costs money, as do schoolbooks, medicine, and tea.

How Solar Lanterns Are Giving Power to the People National Geographic magazine

Source: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2015/1...

Stashed in: Light, Awesome, India, Energy!, National Geographic

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A billion people have no access to electricity. 

As solar gets cheaper they may leapfrog the power grid entirely. 

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