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6 Teas That Block Fat And Prevent Obesity


Stashed in: Awesome, Fat!, Nutrition!, Diabetes, Tea!, Food, Reference, Weight Loss, They did the math.

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Not sure about the science behind this article. For example, green tea:

How does it promote weight loss?

Increased thermogenesis and fat oxidation: due to its green tea-caffeine mixture (epigallocatechin gallate + caffeine)

Inhibition of phosphodiesterase: the inhibition of this enzyme leads to increased fat oxidation and thermogenesis

Reduced weight regain: a green tea-caffeine mixture has the wonderful side effect of reducing body weight regain after significant weight loss. Green tea achieves  that through the thermogenic effect mentioned above.

Chemicals found in WT that help block fat:

Scientific studies have shown that green tea contains a large amounts of tea catechins. Catechol-O-methyltransferase is known as an intracellular enzyme and is omnipresent throughout all mammalian tissues, including skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. COMT is an active enzyme that stimulates the breakdown of fats and other lipids by hydrolysis to release fatty acids.

We want to believe.

Here's a small study that seems to support green tea fat oxidation theory:

Meanwhile fat oxidation rates increased by 25 per cent. This is important because fat oxidation aids weight loss. 

The 14 volunteers were asked to cycle for one hour, three times a week.

Those taking the capsule noted their performance increased by 10.9 per cent over a four-week period, increasing the distance they covered from an average of 20.2km to 22.4km.

Dr Justin Roberts, who led the study, said: 'It is known that green tea as a drink can have numerous health benefits as it contains a relatively high amount of an ingredient called EGCG.

'However, to get the dosage required may require close to six or seven cups of green tea a day.

'The 571mg capsules tested contained a daily EGCG dose of 400mg.

'In essence, our study showed that the use of a green tea extract could potentially help people to lose weight, if combined with exercise.

'However, we recognise that a larger scale study is now required.' 

The study was published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2941319/Green-tea-DOES-help-lose-weight-need-drink-seven-decaff-cups-day-study-finds.html#ixzz3zyL9lA5d 

Thanks for this.

Combining tea with exercise seems key.

I wonder if this is true for other teas named:

White Tea, Black Tea, Barberry Tea, Rooibos Tea, Pu-ehr Tea

Green tea (I use the decaf kind now) seems like one of those "can't hurt and might help" things, so why not? Can all those billions of Asian people who drink tea and walk/bike be wrong? ;)

Let me complicate things:

Oolong Versus Green Versus Black Tea

Green tea is known for its high catechin content because it isn't fermented like black tea, which turns the catechins into another beneficial plant chemical called theaflavins. Oolong tea, on the other hand, is partially fermented, so it has an intermediate amount of these compounds. The caffeine content can vary between the types of tea, with green usually having the least and black containing the most. Because green tea also has more catechins, it may have more of an effect on weight loss than oolong tea, while black tea may have less of an effect on weight loss.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/303736-facts-about-oolong-tea-weight-loss/

The flouride levels in inexpensive green tea tend to be exceedingly high, i.e. easy to exceed the recommended levels. 

How would I know which green teas have an acceptable level of fluoride?

Geege there are entire websites devoted to that question.  In general organic would be helpful as a lot of the flouride (which the tea naturally has an affinity for) is coming from pesticides.  In general its less of a problem for higher-quality teas in general (where the growers are careful about the soil).  If you drink a lot of tea, I'd look into it... lots of folks have "done the math" and made a decision based on this.  Lots of options, I think excluding tea isn't necessary but managing flouride is.  Even the recent Harvard study points to this.

Thank you, TPP.  The more you know. :)

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