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How the FBI Uses Facial Recognition to Fight Crime


No two people have the same fingerprints, and no two people have the same visage either. The FBI’s technology measures minute distances in a person’s face and logs the information. And while the bureau’s biometric methods are still in their infancy, FBI officials say the program could help law enforcement locate and identify a suspect using surveillance videos, mug shots or even photos taken from Facebook and Twitter.

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http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/how-the-fbi-uses-facial-recognition-to-fight-crime/ar-BBrXvxt

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This article would not load straight from Newsweek, and I tried everything... for close to ½ hour! No problems with other articles. http://www.newsweek.com/fbi-biometrics-facial-recognition-next-generation-identification-449146. I finally got this:

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No problem loading on my PC (there were some .svg files that weren't on the MSN link). So... why couldn't IOS load this Newsweek FBI article? (I tried Chrome on my iPad and that didn't work, either.)

Nope. (edit 7:34PM — I just stashed another Newsweek article. No problems at all.)

It's a mystery to me. Works on my iPad. 

We are all suspects. 

“What we’re seeing is how counterterrorism and counterinsurgency tactics are being codified into everyday policing,” says Hamid Khan, a privacy advocate in Los Angeles and the founder of a grass-roots group called Stop LAPD Spying. “In essence, we’re all suspects.”

While facial recognition technology conjures images of a Minority Report–like control room, the reality is a bit more prosaic. No two people have the same fingerprints, and no two people have the same visage either. The FBI’s technology measures minute distances in a person’s face and logs the information. And while the bureau’s biometric methods are still in their infancy, FBI officials say the program could help law enforcement locate and identify a suspect using surveillance videos, mug shots or even photos taken from Facebook and Twitter.

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