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70% of wealthy families lose their wealth by the second generation, and a stunning 90% by the third.


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tTe stat above is from the Williams Group wealth consultancy. More facts:

U.S. Trust recently surveyed high-net-worth individuals with more than $3 million in investable assets to find out how they are preparing the next generation for handling significant wealth.

“Looking at the numbers, 78% feel the next generation is not financially responsible enough to handle inheritance,” says Chris Heilmann, U.S. Trust’s chief fiduciary executive.

And 64% admit they have disclosed little to nothing about their wealth to their children.

The survey lists various reasons: People were taught not to talk about money, they worry their children will become lazy and entitled, and they fear the information will leak out.

When I asked financial planners why the wealthy are so poor at passing along money smarts and why second- and third-generation heirs turn out to be so ham-handed, the answers were surprisingly frank.

A sampling: “Most of them have no clue as to the value of money or how to handle it.” “Generation Threes are usually doomed.” “It takes the average recipient of an inheritance 19 days until they buy a new car.”

What to do about it:

If you have just never talked about money, get over it, and give your kids a crash course in financial literacy. Many financial institutions, including U.S. Trust, offer specialized learning materials and courses to get heirs up to speed.

That goes for grandkids, too: Instill smart money lessons in them, and you have pushed family wealth forward another 30 or 40 years.

what about unbreakable trusts?

They can be good, depending on your situation. Pros and cons:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/20/realestate/the-pros-and-cons-of-a-living-trust.html

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