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The code that took America to the moon was just published to GitHub, and it’s like a 1960s time capsule.


Stashed in: Software!, Awesome, GitHub, History of Tech!, NASA, NASA to Me, Space!, 1960s, Extraordinary People, History of Tech, 1960s, Grace Hopper, Women in Tech, GitHub

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this is great. 

Yeah, cool use of Github and a wonderful slice of history.

The photo above:

Here’s a very 1960s data visualization of just how much code they wrote—this is Margaret Hamilton, director of software engineering for the project, standing next to a stack of paper containing the software.

Margaret Hamilton has won the Medal of Freedom:

https://twitter.com/nasa/status/801203984484696064

My favorite part of the article:

The effort made the code available to any researcher or hobbyist who wanted to explore it. Burkey himself even used the software to create a simulation of the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC):

As enormous and successful as Burkey’s project has been, however, the code itself remained somewhat obscure to many of today’s software developers. That was until last Thursday (July 7), when former NASA intern Chris Garry uploaded the software in its entirety to GitHub, the code-sharing site where millions of programmers hang out these days.

Within hours, coders began dissecting the software, particularly looking at the code comments the AGC’s original programmers had written. In programming, comments are plain-English descriptions of what task is being performed at a given point. But as the always-sharp joke detectives in Reddit’s r/ProgrammerHumor section found, many of the comments in the AGC code go beyond boring explanations of the software itself. They’re full of light-hearted jokes and messages, and very 1960s references.

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