Sign up FAST! Login

What I Learned About Life After Interviewing 80 Highly Successful People, by James Altucher


Stashed in: LinkedIn, Gratitude, #success, @jaltucher, Awesome, Give and Take, Give and Take

To save this post, select a stash from drop-down menu or type in a new one:

I'm not always in the mood for James Altucher, but you know what? Good for him for writing up what he learned from his diverse set of podcast interviewees. Some really deep stuff here for sure.

Yeah, this is quite good:

A) A life is measured in decades.

Too many people want happiness, love, money, connections, everything yesterday. Me too. I call it "the disease." I feel often I can paint over a certain emptiness inside if only...if only...I have X.

But a good life is like the flame of a bonfire. 

It builds slowly, and because it's slow and warm it caresses the heart instead of destroys it.

B) A life is measured by what you did TODAY, even this moment.

This is the opposite of "A" but the same. You get success in decades by having success now.That doesn't mean money now. It means, "Are you doing your best today?"

Everyone worked at physical health, improving their friendships and connections with others, being creative, being grateful. Every day.

For those who didn't, they quickly got sick, depressed, anxious, fearful. They had to change their lives. When they made that change, universally they all said to me, "that's when it all started."

I've never heard of The Push to get up each day, but it does seem quite important.

C) Focus is not important, but Push is (reinvention).

Very few people have just one career. And for every career, it's never straight up.

When you have focus, it's like saying, "I'm just going to learn about only one thing forever." But "the push" is the ability to get up every day, open up the shades, and push through all the things that make you want to go back to sleep.

Even if it means changing careers 10 times. Or changing your life completely. Just pushing forward to create a little more life inside yourself.

Compound life is much more powerful than compound interest.

Good gratitude idea: One thank you every day.

The best way to create a great business over time: Every day send one thank you letter to someone from your past. People (me) often say you can't look back at the past. But this is the one way you can. You create the future by thanking the past.

This one's a page out of Adam Grant.

D) Give without thinking of what you will receive.

I don't think I spoke to a single person who believed in setting personal goals. But 100% of the people I spoke to wanted to solve a problem for the many.

It doesn't matter how you give each day. It doesn't even matter how much. But everyone wanted to give and eventually they were given back.

E) Solving hard problems is more important than overcoming failure.

The outside world is a mirror of what you have on the inside. If Thomas Edison viewed his 999 attempts at creating a lightbulb a failure then he would've given up. His inside was curious. His inside viewed his "attempts" as experiments. Then he did #1000. Now we can see in the dark.

This one's a page out of Steve Jobs.

F) Art and success and love is about connecting all the dots.

Here are some dots: The very personal sadness sitting inside of you. The things you learn. The things you read about. The things you love. Connect the dots. Give it to someone.

Now you just gave birth to a legacy that will continue beyond you.

The rest of the article is good. This is my favorite:

H) You can't predict the outcome, you can only do your best.

Hugh Howey thought he would write novels that only his family would read. So he wrote ten of them. Then he wrote "Wool," which he self-published and has sold millions of copies and Ridley Scott is making the movie.

Clayton Anderson applied to be an astronaut for 15 years in a row and was rejected each time until the 16th.

Coolio wrote lyrics down every day for 17 years before having a hit. Noah Kaganwas fired from Facebook and Mint without making a dime before starting his own business. Wayne Dyer quit his secure job as a tenured professor, put a bunch of his books in car and drove across the country selling them in every bookstore. Now he's sold over 100,000,000 books.

Sometimes when I have conversations with these people they want to jump right to the successful parts but I stop them. I want to know the low points. The points where they had to start doing their best. What got them to that point.

Panda, you just quoted the whole damn article!!!

Haha actually I only included a third of it. He goes to letter L and says he could make 100 points!

You May Also Like: