Sign up FAST! Login

One Person’s Cancer Can Be Fought Using Someone Else’s Immune Cells, Study Finds

In a new study, scientists have shown that by inserting certain components of healthy donor immune cells (or T cells) into the malfunctioning immune cells of a cancer patient, they can ‘teach’ these cells how to recognise cancer cells and attack them.


Stashed in: Awesome, Medicine, Cancer, Medical Breakthroughs, Cancer

To save this post, select a stash from drop-down menu or type in a new one:

A new step in cancer immunotherapy: researchers from the Netherlands Cancer Institute and University of Oslo/Oslo University Hospital show that even if one's own immune cells cannot recognize and fight their tumors, someone else's immune cells might. Their proof of principle study is published in the journal Science on May 19th.

The study shows that adding mutated DNA from cancer cells into immune stimulating cells from healthy donors create an immune response in the healthy immune cells. Inserting the targeted components from the donor immune cells back into the immune cells of the cancer patients, the researchers were able to make cancer patients' own immune cells recognize cancer cells.

Cool. Does this mean we might see immune cell transplants in the future?

You May Also Like: